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teachersworldwide:

World Inequality Database on Education

The World Inequality Database on Education (WIDE) highlights the powerful influence of circumstances, such as wealth, gender, ethnicity and location, over which people have little control but which play an important role in shaping their opportunities for education and life. It draws attention to unacceptable levels of education inequality across countries and between groups within countries, with the aim of helping to inform policy design and public debate.

(via DME WIDE • World Inequality Database on Education)

reportagebygettyimages:

Attacks on healthcare workers and facilities have become a common feature of violent conflict throughout the world. From Syria to Somalia, there is a dangerous lack of respect for the neutrality of these institutions and personnel: hospitals are shelled; ambulances are fired upon; the wounded languish for hours in checkpoint queues. To raise awareness of this crucial yet overlooked humanitarian crisis, the International Committee of the Red Cross has teamed with Reportage by Getty Images to create their “Health Care in Danger” campaign, which urges people to respect healthcare and healthcare workers in wars.

To imbue the campaign with a sense of reality equal to the tragedy, the ICRC enlisted Reportage photographer Tom Stoddart, who drew on his experience of working in conflict zones. In the video below, Tom, along with staff from the ICRC and Getty Images, explains how he created these images to reflect real-world scenarios.

Getty Images BTS ICRC shoot from Reportage by Getty Images on Vimeo.

The ads will appear on bus shelters and in metro stations across seven European cities throughout December: Amsterdam, Berlin, London, Madrid, Warsaw, Brussels and Paris.

You can learn more about the ICRC’s “Health Care in Danger” campaign on the organization’s Web site. See more work by Tom Stoddart and other Reportage photographers here.

icphoto:

UPCOMING EXHIBITION: 
LEWIS HINEOn view October 4, 2013 – January 19, 2014
Lewis Hine (1874–1940) is widely recognized as an American original whose work has been cited as a precursor to modernist and documentary photography. While certain of Hine’s photographic projects—such as on immigration, child labor, New York City, and the building of the Empire State Building—are well known, few exhibitions have considered his entire life’s work. The aim of Lewis Hine is to provide a broad overview of his photographic career, using supplementary material to situate the photographs in the contexts of their original consumption while providing a platform for reconsidering the work today—both historically and artistically. The exhibition includes Hine’s earliest work from Ellis Island (1905) and extensive selections from every major project that followed, including “Hull House,” “American Red Cross in Europe,” and “Men at Work.” The exhibition is curated by Alison Nordström, Curator of Photographs at George Eastman House International Museum of Photography and Film, which holds the largest and most comprehensive archive of Hine’s work.
 
 
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icphoto:

UPCOMING EXHIBITION: 
LEWIS HINEOn view October 4, 2013 – January 19, 2014
Lewis Hine (1874–1940) is widely recognized as an American original whose work has been cited as a precursor to modernist and documentary photography. While certain of Hine’s photographic projects—such as on immigration, child labor, New York City, and the building of the Empire State Building—are well known, few exhibitions have considered his entire life’s work. The aim of Lewis Hine is to provide a broad overview of his photographic career, using supplementary material to situate the photographs in the contexts of their original consumption while providing a platform for reconsidering the work today—both historically and artistically. The exhibition includes Hine’s earliest work from Ellis Island (1905) and extensive selections from every major project that followed, including “Hull House,” “American Red Cross in Europe,” and “Men at Work.” The exhibition is curated by Alison Nordström, Curator of Photographs at George Eastman House International Museum of Photography and Film, which holds the largest and most comprehensive archive of Hine’s work.
 
 
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icphoto:

UPCOMING EXHIBITION: 
LEWIS HINEOn view October 4, 2013 – January 19, 2014
Lewis Hine (1874–1940) is widely recognized as an American original whose work has been cited as a precursor to modernist and documentary photography. While certain of Hine’s photographic projects—such as on immigration, child labor, New York City, and the building of the Empire State Building—are well known, few exhibitions have considered his entire life’s work. The aim of Lewis Hine is to provide a broad overview of his photographic career, using supplementary material to situate the photographs in the contexts of their original consumption while providing a platform for reconsidering the work today—both historically and artistically. The exhibition includes Hine’s earliest work from Ellis Island (1905) and extensive selections from every major project that followed, including “Hull House,” “American Red Cross in Europe,” and “Men at Work.” The exhibition is curated by Alison Nordström, Curator of Photographs at George Eastman House International Museum of Photography and Film, which holds the largest and most comprehensive archive of Hine’s work.
 
 
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icphoto:

UPCOMING EXHIBITION: 
LEWIS HINEOn view October 4, 2013 – January 19, 2014
Lewis Hine (1874–1940) is widely recognized as an American original whose work has been cited as a precursor to modernist and documentary photography. While certain of Hine’s photographic projects—such as on immigration, child labor, New York City, and the building of the Empire State Building—are well known, few exhibitions have considered his entire life’s work. The aim of Lewis Hine is to provide a broad overview of his photographic career, using supplementary material to situate the photographs in the contexts of their original consumption while providing a platform for reconsidering the work today—both historically and artistically. The exhibition includes Hine’s earliest work from Ellis Island (1905) and extensive selections from every major project that followed, including “Hull House,” “American Red Cross in Europe,” and “Men at Work.” The exhibition is curated by Alison Nordström, Curator of Photographs at George Eastman House International Museum of Photography and Film, which holds the largest and most comprehensive archive of Hine’s work.
 
 
Zoom Info
icphoto:

UPCOMING EXHIBITION: 
LEWIS HINEOn view October 4, 2013 – January 19, 2014
Lewis Hine (1874–1940) is widely recognized as an American original whose work has been cited as a precursor to modernist and documentary photography. While certain of Hine’s photographic projects—such as on immigration, child labor, New York City, and the building of the Empire State Building—are well known, few exhibitions have considered his entire life’s work. The aim of Lewis Hine is to provide a broad overview of his photographic career, using supplementary material to situate the photographs in the contexts of their original consumption while providing a platform for reconsidering the work today—both historically and artistically. The exhibition includes Hine’s earliest work from Ellis Island (1905) and extensive selections from every major project that followed, including “Hull House,” “American Red Cross in Europe,” and “Men at Work.” The exhibition is curated by Alison Nordström, Curator of Photographs at George Eastman House International Museum of Photography and Film, which holds the largest and most comprehensive archive of Hine’s work.
 
 
Zoom Info

icphoto:

UPCOMING EXHIBITION:

LEWIS HINE
On view October 4, 2013 – January 19, 2014

Lewis Hine (1874–1940) is widely recognized as an American original whose work has been cited as a precursor to modernist and documentary photography. While certain of Hine’s photographic projects—such as on immigration, child labor, New York City, and the building of the Empire State Building—are well known, few exhibitions have considered his entire life’s work. The aim of Lewis Hine is to provide a broad overview of his photographic career, using supplementary material to situate the photographs in the contexts of their original consumption while providing a platform for reconsidering the work today—both historically and artistically. The exhibition includes Hine’s earliest work from Ellis Island (1905) and extensive selections from every major project that followed, including “Hull House,” “American Red Cross in Europe,” and “Men at Work.” The exhibition is curated by Alison Nordström, Curator of Photographs at George Eastman House International Museum of Photography and Film, which holds the largest and most comprehensive archive of Hine’s work.

 

 

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